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Pre-congress Workshops

Optional pre-congress workshops are available at an extra fee. Registration is open to all. Full congress registration is not required to register for pre-congress workshops. Workshops are either full day, morning or afternoon.

Click on the workshop titles and the speaker names below for further details.

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  • September 23, 2019 - Pre-congress Academy Workshops


  • Cancer survivors clearly want support from healthcare providers with work concerns as a result of their cancer (de Moor et al. 2018; Kennedy et al. 2007; Stergiou-Kita et al. 2016). In this practical workshop, we offer healthcare providers an overview of the latest research, best practice informed strategies and resources to support cancer survivors with remaining, returning and finding work. The research overview will include a focus on psychological factors such as work stress and cancer. Attendees will be introduced to a vocational rehabilitation model for cancer survivors to aid their assessment and shown steps they can follow in the return to work process. The vocational rehabilitation model will highlight different features that healthcare providers need to consider including: biopsychological, systems, person related and worksite factors. Attendees will learn of valuable resources that they can use within Cancer and Work (www.cancerandwork; recipient of a leading practice award by Health Standards Organization of Canada). The attendees will work through real case scenarios to apply the eleven return to work steps and the vocational rehabilitation model for cancer survivors. This hands-on practical workshop will allow attendees to significantly improve their knowledge, skills, and confidence to support cancer survivors with work-related concerns. Learning objectives: 1. provide an overview of clinically relevant research to cancer and work 2. provide a focused review on how psychological factors can impact cancer survivors related to work, such as work stress and cancer 3. provide an introduction to vocational rehabilitation model for cancer survivors to guide assessment and support 4. introduce 11 steps that healthcare providers can follow to support cancer survivors with remaining and returning to work 5. have participants use a vocational rehabilitation model, a 11 steps return to work process and information from www.cancerandwork.ca to work through practical case examples to improve knowledge and skill in supporting cancer survivors with work concerns.
    Pre-congress Workshops
    Where
    TBD

  • This workshop will include a lecture, case presentations, and an experiential part to provide an overview of the most useful application of expressive arts interventions for patients with cancer. Clinical case presentations will show the art products of patients and review their experience and consequences with the creative process and its effect on a physical, emotional and spiritual level. Participants will be introduced to the topics of “intermodal transfer”, “autonomy control” and “triangulation,” basic paradigms of the expressive art therapy process. During the workshop participants have the opportunity to participate in experiential exercises and to be introduced to different expressive arts modalities in order to initiate their own dialogue between life experience and creative expression and will explain how to apply the creative process interventions. If time allows we will reflect about an international art therapy project with cancer patients whereby collecting stories and art products of patients who have experienced the benefits of using the creative process and to create an international Healing Arts Exhibition. Learning objectives: 1. How to facilitate some useful art interventions as a specific indication during acute stages of illness, as a supporting tool during the rehabilitation process and how to support and foster meaning during the final stage of illness. 2. How specific art therapy interventions could meet the special needs of cancer patients in this context by reducing anxiety and emotional stress, enabling perception and facilitating expression of emotions, promoting inner strength and sense of purpose, to strengthen and support autonomy and establishing new life perspectives. 3. By participating in the self-experiential module, attendees will reconnect to their own innate creative potential on a physical, emotional, cognitive and spiritual level and understand the therapeutic potential of the transforming abilities of creative therapies and how to apply them to their patients. 4. Participants will as well learn how to use and facilitate some specific expressive art therapy tools for their own self-care and psychohygenic use whilst working with patients and experience an innovative stress management tool.
    Pre-congress Workshops
    Where
    TBD

  • The purpose of this workshop is to provide participants with an introduction to conducting psychosocial oncology Indigenous research focusing on epistemology, research methodologies and methods. The presenters will provide a review of ethical principles to consider and how to build collaborative research projects-the role of ‘insider’ - ‘outsider’ / ‘community-member’ – ‘non-community member’. The participants will learn about cultural safety and the importance of engaging in reflective practice when pursuing research with Indigenous people. Participants will be provided with examples of successes and challenges when conducting Indigenous research based on the Presenters’ research experience from Australia and Canada, including guidance regarding dissemination of findings and publication in this field. Participants are asked to come prepared to discuss their research projects and will have an opportunity to interact with the Workshop Chairs and other participants to develop their research protocols. A list of articles and other resources will be provided for participants to review. Learning objectives: 1. Provide an introduction to conducting Indigenous psychosocial oncology research focused on epistemology and research methodologies and approaches 2. Provide an overview of ethics to consider when pursuing an Indigenous research project 3. Provide an opportunity for participants to discuss their Indigenous research protocol and receive input
    Pre-congress Workshops
    Where
    TBD

  • Managing Cancer And Living Meaningfully (CALM) is a brief, manualized, evidence-based psychotherapeutic intervention uniquely tailored to reduce or prevent distress in individuals with advanced or metastatic cancer and their families. It consists of 3-6 psychotherapeutic sessions delivered over 6 months and has been shown to reduce distress and increase well-being in this population. The morning of the workshop will consist of two streams: 1. Introductory: Formal lectures and video-recordings of real psychotherapeutic sessions will be used to teach the theoretical foundations, therapeutic process, and content domains of CALM 2. Advanced (for participants with prior exposure to CALM): Focus on theoretical issues, refinement of techniques, and skills to teach and supervise other CALM therapists. The afternoon session will integrate theory, research, and the clinical application of CALM. Participants will have the opportunity to reflect on the day, provide feedback, and contribute to an open discussion about future CALM cases in their settings. Learning Objectives: Learn the theoretical foundations, content domains, and therapeutic processes of CALM. 2. Explore the clinical application of CALM as illustrated through video-recorded real psychotherapeutic sessions. 3. Enhance skills and comfort in treating emotional distress in individuals with advanced or metastatic cancer.
    Pre-congress Workshops
    Where
    TBD

  • This workshop will focus on the most frequently cited unmet need of cancer survivors – fear of cancer recurrence (FCR). FCR is present in a range of severity in all people who survive cancer, with up to 49% of survivors reporting elevated or ‘clinical’ levels of this concern. For these survivors, FCR is persistent and disabling, preventing them from making future plans, causing over-screening and over-use of medical services and compromising quality of life. Fortunately, several trials of evidence-based and theoretically supported therapies have been successfully completed in the past 5 years. This workshop will provide a review of the frameworks of two of these recent therapies (the ConquerFear and FORT studies) for understanding FCR. These therapies (one face-to-face, the other a group face-to-face intervention) combine elements of the Self-Regulatory Executive Function (S-REF) model, Relational Frame Theory and Self Regulation Theory (ConquerFear) and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Existential Therapy (FORT). The content and exercises of these two therapies will be presented in detail. Practical strategies to implement these therapies will be demonstrated and practiced in the workshop. Patient handouts, relevant papers, and frameworks will be provided to workshop attendees. Learning objectives: 1. The attendee shall be able to describe two theoretical frameworks for FCR 2. The attendee shall be able to describe and deliver methods to reduce FCR, including cognitive restructuring, attention training, mindfulness training, awareness and challenging of meta-cognitions about worry, exposure to worst fears, education and encouragement of appropriate levels of screening and monitoring for cancer recurrence.
    Pre-congress Workshops
    Where
    TBD

  • Statistical analysis, reporting and interpretation of Randomized Controlled Trials (RCT) is of great importance for researchers within psycho-oncology. The objective of this workshop is to introduce the standard elements of an analysis plan of a RCT from a statistical perspective. This includes formulation of hypothesis, generating and reporting descriptive statistics in terms of patient inclusion and presentation of baseline characteristics. Furthermore, power considerations, formulation of relevant statistical models, and reporting and interpretation of findings, is discussed. The workshop is hands-on with RCT case studies within psycho-oncology and practical illustrations using the statistical software. Learning objectives: 1. To learn about the standard elements of a statistical analysis plan for an RCTs 2. Introduction to the most common statistical models used for RCTs 3. Interpretation and reporting of RCTs
    Pre-congress Workshops
    Where
    TBD

  • Adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer patients have unique clinical and psychological presentations. It is likely that when working in Psycho-oncology most clinicians will need to work with AYA patients at some time. However, if not doing this work often clinicians may feel out of their depth and uncertain. The workshop will provide an adaptation of the Acceptance and Commitment Therapy framework and interventions for use in an AYA Population with cancer. Participants will be able to develop skills and techniques to adapt their existing practice to the unique experience of working with AYA patients and their families. The workshop will have a particular focus around clinical presentations across all aspects of the treatment trajectory including diagnosis, survivorship and end of life concerns. There will also engagement around AYA specific issues around competency, risk assessment and treatment refusal in the context of treatment and normal adjustment. The workshop is aimed at clinicians who have some ACT knowledge, but do not need to be working extensively with ACT. Attendees should be prepared to engage in some experiential learning as well as be open to discussing novel ways of working therapeutically. Learning objectives: 1. Increased knowledge and awareness of the psychosocial challenges for an AYA population 2. Development and Adaptation of ACT skills for use in an AYA Population 3. Development of skills to adapt ACT based strategies into existing therapeutic frameworks.
    Pre-congress Workshops
    Where
    TBD

  • This half-day workshop aims to familiarize participants with the principles of holistic neuropsychological and vocational rehabilitation, as developed in the context of intervention for acquired brain damage, and to show how they can be adapted and applied in a day program setting to effectively address neuropsychological sequelae of disease and treatment among cancer survivors. In light of empirical and clinical findings on cancer-related neuropsychological complaints, both cognitive and emotional, and their broad influence on daily life and well-being during and after recovery, the Israeli National Institute for the Rehabilitation of the Brain injured has developed a holistic rehabilitation program for survivors, grounded in years of experience treating related populations. Using this program as an illustration, the workshop will review the component interventions (e.g., cognitive training, psychotherapy, etc.) and address key processes in its establishment, including: assessment of potential clients, determination of suitability for inclusion, and creation of tailored intervention plans in accordance with personal and vocational goals. Through case examples and experiential methods, workshop participants already experienced in providing various aspects of post-cancer care will be exposed to notable dilemmas, challenges, and solutions associated with the successful facilitation of vocational and social re-integration following cancer through neuropsychological rehabilitation. Learning objectives: 1. To become acquainted with holistic neuropsychological and vocational rehabilitation, as developed in the context of intervention for acquired brain damage. 2. To learn about the structure and content of a holistic neurorehabilitation day program specifically adapted and tailored to the needs of cancer survivors. 3. To experience primary processes involved in establishing and maintaining a holistic neurorehabilitation day program for cancer survivors.
    Where
    TBD

  • Up to 60% of cancer survivors experience significant sleep difficulties. This is double that of the general population, and can often be attributed to the physical and psychological impact of cancer treatment and recovery. Poor sleep is associated with anxiety, depression, concentration and memory difficulties, higher rates of pain, increased use of sedatives and poorer quality of life. Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) is considered to be the gold-standard treatment for primary and secondary insomnia, and is also effective in improving fatigue, menopausal symptoms, mood, cognitive functioning, pain, quality of life, immunological function, and reduced need for medication. Up to 77% of cancer patients have been found to achieve remission or significant reduction in sleep disturbances after undertaking CBT for insomnia. This workshop will provide health professionals with methods of screening for insomnia and other sleep disorders, ways to adapt core CBT strategies to more effectively treat insomnia and sleep disturbances in oncology patients, and information on different models of care that can be adapted to your service (e.g., stepped care, self-help and/or therapist-led programs). This workshop will include case-studies, practice opportunities and provision of relevant resources to health professionals. Learning objectives: 1. Understanding of common sleep problems/disorders, their causes in people with cancer, and different methods of delivering CBTi (self-help, in person, group). 2. Knowledge of screening tools to assess and identify at-risk patients 3. Understanding of ways to adapt core CBT strategies to treat sleep problems in people with cancer, including stimulus control and sleep restriction.
    Pre-congress Workshops
    Where
    TBD

  • Cancer and its treatments has profound and often persistent impacts on body image and related issues, reducing the quality of life. 20-75% of cancer survivors report body image disturbance and decreased sexual functioning post-diagnosis. Lack of knowledge and skill among health professionals and lack of available interventions pose as barriers to follow up care. Studies demonstrate that specific facets of body image disturbance in cancer populations (e.g. body stigma, shame, feelings of alienation or disconnectedness from one’s body) can be addressed through targeted treatments. The proposed workshop will provide an evidenced-based framework on the multi-determined nature of body image, including socialization factors at play. Psychosocial screening instruments to support follow up care will be presented. Restoring Body Image after Cancer (ReBIC): a group therapy approach that addresses cancer-related body image disturbance and associated issues will be introduced. ReBIC incorporates techniques, such as guided imagery exercises, effective in working through body image changes; psychoeducation on the sociocultural factors; and information to support sexual functioning. A randomized controlled trial demonstrated the efficacy of ReBIC in providing a safe forum for survivors to rebuild their body image, facilitated continuity of self and improved quality of life. Group exercises and case material will illustrate the intervention. Learning objectives: 1. Learn the theoretical foundation and multi-determined nature of body image and formations of disturbance. 2. Gain knowledge and skill in the psychosocial screening of body image and psychosexual functioning among cancer patients 3. Enhance skills in use of guided imagery techniques and specific psychosocial interventions to address body image-related distress and psychosexual functioning.
    Pre-congress Workshops
    Where
    TBD

  • Family caregivers regularly attend consultations as cancer patient supporters/advocates. When informed and empowered, family caregivers can be a valuable partner in cancer care. However, research shows that oncology clinicians do not always meaningfully engage with caregivers. Also, some caregivers can introduce challenges, such as if they dominate the patient, request private patient information, or display anger towards staff. Building a positive working relationship with caregivers and managing these challenges requires skill. The newly developed TRIO Guidelines for communicating with family caregivers provide evidence- based recommendations for oncology clinicians interacting with a patient’s family. This workshop will provide an overview of the TRIO Guidelines, and demonstrate best-practice approaches to facilitating effective family involvement while also managing common clinical challenges. It will specifically focus on: • building a positive relationship with caregivers, • discussing sensitive information, • managing family anger, • reconciling conflicting patient-family treatment wishes, and • managing longstanding family conflict Professionally produced short films will be featured, to model specific behaviours/phrases from the TRIO Guidelines used in common clinical scenarios. The workshop will utilize web-technology to promote experiential learning, engagement, and uptake of key skills and strategies, and will include interactive small group discussions. Hard copies of the TRIO Guidelines will be provided. Learning objectives: 1. To understand the needs and challenges faced by family caregivers 2. To learn evidence-based strategies on how to positively and effectively engage family caregivers in everyday clinical encounters 3. To learn evidence-based strategies for addressing the following complex clinical situations: family member anger, requests for disclosure of sensitive information, and patient-family conflict/dysfunction. 4. To reflect on own interactions with family caregivers
    Pre-congress Workshops
    Where
    TBD

  • September 24, 2019
 - Congress Day 1


  • Dr. Howard Krein is the Chief Medical Officer of StartUp Health, which is on a 25-year mission to collaborate with entrepreneurs to improve the health and wellbeing of everyone in the world. Since 2011, StartUp Health has been investing in a global army of entrepreneurs, called Health Transformers, to achieve health moonshots. StartUp Health has the world’s largest health innovation portfolio with more than 280 companies from 23 countries and six continents. In addition, StartUp Health has assembled a curated worldwide network of 200,000 innovators, industry leaders and investors committed to supporting the entrepreneurs reinventing the future of health. Additionally, Dr. Krein is the Senior Director of Health Policy & Innovation at the Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center. He also is an Assistant Professor of Otolaryngology: Head & Neck Surgery at Thomas Jefferson University and a founding partner and co-director of Jefferson’s Facial Aesthetic and Reconstructive Center. In 2017, Dr. Krein was appointed to the Board of Directors of the Biden Cancer Initiative. Dr. Krein is part of an exclusive group of physicians with two doctorates, receiving his MD from Thomas Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia and a PhD in Cell and Developmental Biology from UMDNJ/Robert Wood Johnson Medical School. Dr. Krein completed internships in both Emergency Medicine and General Surgery, a residency in Otolaryngology: Head and Neck Surgery at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital in Philadelphia and a Fellowship in Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery at Medical College of Virginia in Richmond Virginia. He earned his Bachelor’s degree in Biology and a Master’s degree in Neuroscience from Rutgers University. Dr. Krein lives in Philadelphia, PA.
    Sept 24, 2019 - Day 1

  • In the long run, health research will only help patients if it can be effectively disseminated and implemented. Unfortunately, the public is generally unaware of the value and importance of health research and best available evidence is often not used in clinical practice. The full potential of health research can only be realized if it is effectively disseminated to patients, health care providers, policy makers, and other stakeholders, and implemented into clinical practice and health policy. This plenary will provide an overview of the practice of dissemination and the science of implementation as applied to health. Dissemination involves the sharing and spreading of scientific findings, while implementation focuses on the use of strategies to adopt and integrate science-based intervention to change practice and improve care. Data on both effective and ineffective strategies will be shared and examples from the area of childhood pain management will be described. The presentation will highlight how, to make gains in health research and management, one must consider the application of scientific discoveries to different types of knowledge users and settings, the value of partnerships, the importance of patient engagement, and the role of evolving communication technologies. These factors are critical in promoting sustainable uptake and moving research from bench to bedside to community.
    Sept 24, 2019 - Day 1

  • September 25, 2019 -Congress Day 2


  • This 90-minute symposium incudes speakers from Canada, Finland and the United States, who will speak to the logistics of implementing various elements of physical activity for cancer patients and survivors in clinic and community settings. Specifically, from Finland Dr. Hamari will present on the role of the physical therapist in the clinical setting and the implementation of exercise in pediatric oncology. From the United States, Dr. Sohl will present on the viability of yoga during cancer treatment, with work on implementation of yoga protocols in the clinical setting. Finally, from Canada, Dr. Culos-Reed will present on exercise in the community-setting, using the Alberta Cancer Exercise program and the TrueNTH Lifestyle Management project as examples of sustainable models for implementation.
    Sept 25, 2019 - Day 2

  • Co-Hosts of Sickboy Podcast - Jeremie, Brian and Taylor - will share insights gathered from hundreds of interviews with patients and medical professionals for a look at the patient experience and the need to change how society speaks about the experience of being sick.
    Sept 25, 2019 - Day 2

  • September 26, 2019 
- Congress Day 3


  • There is an abundance of evidence now for a wide range of approaches to address distress and other symptoms, as well as to provide education and supportive services in the field of psychosocial oncology. As cancer populations continue to grow, access to in- person specialized services that address specific needs becomes increasingly challenging. Technology offers solutions. This symposium will illuminate examples from three research programs that focused on developing and testing approaches of providing psychosocial intervention and support to specific cancer populations.
    Sept 26, 2019 - Day 3